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Psycholinguistics: Lukatela & Turvey 1994B
Lukatela1994B.zip
Lukatela1994BStimuli.zip
Lukatela1994bData.zip
Lukatela, G. and Turvey, M. T. (1994). Visual lexical access is initially phonolgical: 2. Evidence from phonological priming by homophones and pseudohomophones. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 123(4), 331-353. (HTML)
 
In this task, participants were given a prime, followed by a target word that they were supposed to name. The primes were either homophones, pseudohomophones (nonwords that look like they should be pronounced like the target), or graphemic controls (words that looked like the target, but were not pronounced like it).

The homophones and psedohomophones speeded naming the word, while graphemic controls seemed about as effective as normal (unrelated) controls. This implies that initial access to words is phonological, rather than graphemic.

Lukatela & Turvey 1994A, Perfetti, Bell, and Delaney 1988
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Lukatela, G., Carello, C., & Turvey, M.T. (1990a). Phonemic priming by words and pseudowords. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 2, 375-394.

Lukatela, G., Carello, C., & Turvey, M.T. (1990b). Phonemic, associative, and grammatical context effects with identified and unidentified primes. Language and Speech, 33, 1-18.

Lukatela, G., Lukatela, K., Carello, C., & Turvey, M.T. (1993). Delay and degradation reduce alphabet priming. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition.

Lukatela, G., Lukatela, K., & Turvey, M.T. (1993). Further evidence for phonological constraints on visual lexical access: TOWED primes FROG. Perception & Psychophysics, 53, 461-466.

Lukatela, G., & Turvey, M.T. (1990a). Phonemic similarity effect and prelexical phonology. Memory & Congnition, 18, 128-152.

Lukatela, G., & Turvey, M.T. (1990b). Automatic and prelexical computation of phonology in visual word identification. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 2, 325-343.

Lukatela, G., & Turvey, M.T. (1991). Phonological access of the lexicon: Evidence from associative priming with pseudohomophones. Jouranl of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 17, 951-966.

Lukatela, G., & Turvey, M.T. (1993). Similar attentional, frequency, and associative effects for pseudohomophones and words. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 19, 166-178.

Lukatela, G., & Turvey, M.T. (1994). Visual lexical access is initially phonological: 1. Evidence from associative priming by words, homophones, and pseudohomophones. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 123, 107-128.

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Lukatela, G., Turvey, M.T., Todorovic, D. (1991). Is alphabet biasing in bialphabetical word perception automatic and prelexical? Journal of Expeirmental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 17, 653-663.

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{Cited By}
Seven experiments were conducted that examined phonological and orthographic priming of naming using three- and four-field masking procedures with prolonged targets. Experiments 1-3 found significant phonolgical priming by homophones (TOWED-toad) that was independent of prime identifiability and prime-target stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA: 30, 60, or 250ms). Subsequent experiments found significant phonolgical priming by pseudohomophones (TODE-toad) that was similarly independent of prime identifiability and SOA. Collectively, the limited effects of orthographic control primes (TOLD-toad, TODS-toad) and the pronounced and orthographically independent effects of phonological primes suggest (a) a leading role in visual word perception for a fast-acting, automatic, assembled phonology, and (b) a phonological basis, rather than an abstract graphemic basis, for the processing equivalency of letter variations.
{Works Cited}
{Data Instructions}
 

12-Mar-2002

Brian MacWhinney